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nevver:

“If you could say it in words, there would be no reason to paint.”
Edward Hopper

90shiphopraprnb:

Goodie Mob

90shiphopraprnb:

Goodie Mob

jayzslifeandtimes:

August Alsina speaks on working with Rocksmith: http://bit.ly/1x52jS4

jayzslifeandtimes:

August Alsina speaks on working with Rocksmith: http://bit.ly/1x52jS4

rude-and-still-ginger:

vladislavgoyo:

Scarlett Johansson and Kate Winslet appeared without makeup VANITY FAIR.

Hollywood beauty Scarlett Johansson and Kate Winslet accepted an offer to play for the magazine Vanity Fair with the ” naked ” face .

Not every actress is ready to share photos without makeup , even on his page on Instagram, not that decorate its popular magazine photo spread . But Scarlett Johansson and Kate Winslet gladly accepted the offer of Vanity Fair and show your “real” person in the latest edition . Creator shooting began photographer Chuck Close , who made two portraits on Polaroid.

Stylists decided to make the whole emphasis on face actresses Scarlett therefore put on a simple gray knitted sweater , and Kate - black . The only decoration steel chains with miniature pendants .

Holy crap, it’s almost as if they look like normal people!

90shiphopraprnb:

LL Cool J, Master P, Foxy Brown & Lauryn Hill

90shiphopraprnb:

LL Cool J, Master P, Foxy Brown & Lauryn Hill

vanityfair:

The 2014 Vanity Fair Hollywood Portfolio

See raw, unretouched Polaroid portraits of Hollywood’s biggest stars.

Photographs by Chuck Close. 

dogthing2:

barely-half-asleep:

Brad Pitt in 1994

I lose my shit every time I see this photoset.

this is not ok

cross-connect:

Steve Salo

When fire tore through Steve Salo’s studio in Torquay he was devastated. Inside the artist’s studio were approximately 70 of his paintings, and 80 drawings and sketchbooks, some of which he had treasured since a child. Every single one was destroyed. All of his art materials and tools were obliterated along with reference books and a cherished drawing case from his childhood. The blaze consumed everything, a lifetime of irreplaceable work reduced to ashes.

“I find it quite hard to talk about it now. The best thing for me is to put it behind me and not ponder over it,” Steve says, clearly still coming to terms with the emotional impact of the disaster that occurred nearly a year ago.

After the fire Steve says it felt like time stood still, “almost like a surreal dream”. He was overcome with confusion, disbelief and grief. For the next couple of months Steve had no desire to paint, unable to motivate himself to even pick up a paintbrush. Eventually, however, the urge to create returned and he began to paint, not with brushes but with his fingers. It was an important step in the healing process.

http://www.saatchiart.com/salo